Class Restriction And Registration Summary

 

CBE 40430 - Section 01: Industrial Chemical Processes (CRN 19961)


Course Description:
The chemical industry is responsible for products and processes that account for nearly 25% of America's GDP. In fact, the industry touches nearly every sector of our economy including agriculture, construction, technology, manufacturing, and retail trade, and is responsible for nearly seven million American jobs. This course examines the characteristics and commercial manufacturing processes of many of the key chemicals that are critical to our quality of life. The course will examine the global market drivers and major innovations that motivated the large scale production of these chemicals. It will also trace the history of several of the major chemical companies that evolved along with the markets for these chemicals. Case studies will be used to describe how discoveries are translated into major commercial chemical process and product innovations.

Associated Term: Fall Semester 2015
Campus: Main
Credits: 3
Grade Mode: Standard Letter
Course may not be repeated

Course Syllabus
CBE 40430 Industrial Chemical Processes



Restrictions:
Must be enrolled in one of the following Major(s):
Chemical Engineering (CHEG)
Must have the following Classifications:
Junior (03) ,  Senior (04)
Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Employee Non-Degree (EM) ,  Graduate Architecture (GA) ,  Graduate Non-Degree (GD) ,  Graduate (GR) ,  St. Mary's College (SM) ,  Undergraduate Non-Degree (UD) ,  Undergraduate (UG)
Must be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
Main (M)

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

Registration Availability (Overflow: Off )
  Maximum Actual Remaining
TOTAL 40 27 13


Enhanced Class Search
Instructor's Description of Course » Degnan, Thomas » CBE  40430 - Section 01:  Industrial Chemical Processes (CRN 19961)
This section presents the instructor's preliminary design of the course. It is intended to help students gain a general sense of what the course will be like.
Course Objectives
In this course you will learn: To learn the specifics of the process chemistries and process conditions used in producing major petrochemicals and most petroleum-based fuels
To learn about the process economics and market forces that drive the production of major petrochemicals, major inorganic chemicals and fuels
To be able to explain how petroleum refineries and petrochemical plants are designed and how they operate.
To understand how biotechnology and biology are impacting and may further impact the production of many major petrochemicals.
To better understand the rich history of innovation and process development that has driven the growth of major companies that manufacture petrochemicals
Additional Instructor Comments
This course examines the commercial manufacturing processes and characteristics of many of the key chemicals that are critical to our quality of life. The course will examine the global market drivers and major innovations that motivated the large scale production of these chemicals. It will also trace the history of several of the major chemical companies that evolved along with the markets for these chemicals. Case studies will be used to describe how discoveries are translated into major commercial chemical process and product innovations. There will be a heavy emphasis on learning about process chemistry and catalysis as well as the history and economics of chemical manufacture.
Use of Class Time Extent (0-3 scale)
Lecture: present material not in the readings
Class discussions or case study reviews
Lecture: review/elaboration of reading material
Quizzes or tests
Cooperative learning (small groups)
In-class exercises, simulations/games, or problem set work
Movies, audio tapes, web clips, etc.
Kinds of Assignments or Learning Activities Emphasis (0-3 scale)
Class attendance
In-class participation
Free-response, essay, or short-answer exam questioning
Individual, original research projects or interviews
Reading
Term/research papers (10 or more pages)
Multiple-choice, matching, or true-false type exam questioning
Types of Reading Materials Extent (0-3 scale)
Textbook
Histories or biographies
Lecture notes or supplements
Other instructor-written handouts
Case studies, court cases, or precedents
Journal/research articles
Official primary sources (govt or church documents, annual reports, etc.)
Popular press (newspapers, magazines, etc.)
Reference materials
Scholarly books, monographs, or other non-fiction texts
Trade publications
Role of teaching assistants (TAs)
Not at all

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